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20130201
20130228
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Book TV 20
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CSPAN2 20
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English 20
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 10:00pm EST
, kathy. it's because of her i'm here today and here at the city university. i sworn after i left maryland having left rutgers i would not go back to the university again. i'm glad i have broken that promise to myself and here. it's a pleasure to be on the podium again. we met in the '70s what we were both regarded as a radical scholar. some might not think that anymore. francis and i were asked by james mcgreger burns to be the co-chair of the american political science invention program. we came up with a program that even i think jim burns was a little alarmed by. he in fact put in to action. i have known francis since then. she has remained an honest and authentic voice of progressivism and radicalism with a deep interest with those they have shown -- the homeless and the poor. not how they can be helped but how they find ways to help themselves through the movement and work that they do. it's a pleasure to have her perspective this afternoon in responding to these comments. i'm very pleasured to jackie davis, the chairman of the -- and rachel and members of the executive committee the
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 6:00pm EST
>> for more information on tvs recent visit to santa fe, new mexico another city visited by her local content vehicle, visit c-span.org/local content. ..a?xx i first came to washington, d.c. in 2000 as a congressional correspondent for the associated press. after spending several years in colombia south carolina and albany new york. now, i am originally from mississippi, the son of two public school teachers come in and being from mississippi, the one thing my parents made sure that i knew was my history. it was almost a state requirement in mississippi to know where you came from. so, when i left mississippi to go to south carolina, i had this desire to history and i studied the history of south carolina. i didn't the same thing when i went to upstate new york. i got involved in learning the african-american history of upstate new york which, by the way, is very vibrant. a lot of the underground railroads ended in upstate new york city have a very vibrant african-american community and history up there. but when i left albany new york to come to washington, d.c., and i knew i
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 7:00am EST
more ominous in the city. it was impossible to is exactly how may people were now slipping under open skies, the most widely estimate wagered over 1 million. overseas journalists and policymakers realizing there was a chance they were not going anywhere begin reporting on their hazard. unsanitary, crime-ridden hotbeds simmering for for the calamity. microcosms. the highlight of the sector generals trip was a visit to one of these camps. take the most famous of all, three course of the way up the hill from downtown port-au-prince on the golf course. the iron gated clubhouse was still a forward operating base of the u.s. army 82nd airborne, the young paratroopers. with curiosity. waiting out front was a more familiar face, smiling between a blue t-shirt and a blue trucker hats, becoming a force is more powerful than the soldiers. sean penn had arrived in haiti \90{l1}s{l0}\'90{l1}s{l0} after the quake, spearheading a new nga bankrolled by a boston form financier. for a few days the leading team of the relief organization distributed water filters and medical aid here and there, then an
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 7:00pm EST
the daily rains to nourish their corn, potatoes, but the weather looked more ominous in the city. it was impossible to say exactly how many people were now sleeping under open skies but the most widely used estimates estimated over a ten knock of the donary's population. jurists reporting on the camps. crime-ridden hot beds of simmering unrest, at risk for further calamity. microcosm for their widely held view of haiti. the high lot of the secretary general's visit was a trip to one of these camps. up the hill, on the golf course. the iron gated clubhouse was still a ford operating base of the u.s. army. young paratroopers peered with curiosity as the diplomatic entered with a fay los angeles of security guards. out front was a more familiar face. it bearer was becoming a force even more powerful than the soldiers, sean penn arrived. for a few days the landing team of the relief organization, or jphro, distributed water filters and medical aid here' and there. then an army officer invited inside the wire. most workers were excited about actress ma rooa. both acors lived in a stru
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 6:15am EST
no uncertain terms, the suburbs are killing us and here's why. and cities can save us and here's why. by far the greatest aspect of the epidemic, i should say of our health challenges in america is the obesity epidemic. it's not that obesity itself is a problem but all these illnesses that obesity leads to. principal among them diabetes. diabetes now consumes 2% of our gdp. a child born after 2000 has a one in three chance in america becoming a diabetic. when i look at the first generation of americans who are going to live shorter lives than their parents. is probably not a huge surprise to you. we've all been talking about longtime about the wonders of the american corn syrup diet, and only reason as the argument have the studies been done comparing diet and physical inactivity. one of them is called gluttony versus law for another doctor at the mayo clinic put patients in electronic underwear and measured every motion, set a certain dietetic regime, study their weight, started pumping calories in and then some people got fat and other people didn't. and expecting some sort of metabolic fa
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 12:00pm EST
. ♪ >> the city itself is try cultural. we both more authors and poets than most communities. >> welcome to santa fe on booktv. with the help of comcast cable partners for the next 90 minutes we will explore the literary scene and history of new mexico and its capital, a city resting at an altitude of almost 7,000 feet whose name means hope and faith in spanish. we will travel in and around this town of 80,000 to meet with local lawyers to learn about the unique cultures, personalities and history of the city and state that dates back 400 years to the times of colonization attempts by the spanish. all this and more as booktv and our comcast cable partners take you to santa fe. >> we're here in the palace press. james mcgrath morris and these are early printing presses. it seemed like a perk picked -- perfect place to talk about the man revolutionized american newspapers. webmac first started working on a boat people would react with recognition when i said i was writing about joseph pulitzer the clear from their expressions they knew the name but nothing about his life because pulitzer shares his
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 7:30pm EST
, new mexico and other cities local content vehicles. go to c-span.org/local content. >> up next, someone talks about dinners hosted by winston churchill during and after world war ii, which is used to persuade world were leaders on various matters. it's about 45 minutes. >> good evening. thank you for coming. i'm delighted to see you here to talk about my new book, "dinner with churchill: policy-making at the dinner table." since i book is about the importance of dinner, i will be brief. i just want to whet your appetite so that go buy my book. those try another sentence. i have lived with winston churchill for four years and it was wonderful, even though that took place in the frigid archives at churchill college. i'm often asked ray got the idea for another book on churchill to ask the thousands are to britain. when i read about this fascinating man and his important accomplishments were achieved at dinners. sometimes that lunch is. as i began to wonder why that was so come away most of the deal struck as the famous international conferences held during world war ii were made
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 9:00am EST
with the internet. but zero well, i can book a ticket now and every day we exclaim cover city eight years getting is quickly and easily are a commonplace things that i don't think it's a cheap ato and evaluating it. i'm not so sure of americans remember burkett was a rockefeller or carnegie, yet yet we drive across bridges with steel. that's a carnegie kids. we used cars powered that will, it will rockefeller built them is the financial system and consuming is built on a system developed and created by people at pulitzer. pulitzer came to the united states and unearthing the soldiers and they went to europe and he didn't really see any action. like many veterans after the war he was on foot, often afterwards hard to integrate people into the economy. he ends up in st. louis greek becomes befriended by a major who becomes a senator from missouri this newspaper publisher. pulitzer enters the road. within five years of his dreamy night state companies elected state legislature to stare. it's that kind of speed of immigration 19th century when people would come in. to become successful in a really sh
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 10:00am EST
was cutting through the middle of the city. with citizens of both sides fearing the brink of world war iii, freed wandered close to the boundary of the divided city. neither on assignment, nor with a predetermined vision who he ended up finding and seeing the most through his camera were american g.i.s. but here at the the wall in its nascent days, freed snapped a photograph of an unnamed black soldier standing at the edge of the american sector. freed's contact sheets from this trip confirm that this image was powerfully a single shot. taken at a middle distance in black and white, freed stands with his subject between a set of trolley tracks that culminate into the imposed boundary of the wall behind them. this encounter haunted freed. it set him off course and beckoned his return from exile to come back to america to confront segregation and racism. image would end up being the first photograph in "black and white america," and as ap annotation in the book, freed sets this out as its point of departure. he writes: we, he and i, two americans, we meet silently, and we part silently. impr
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 4:30pm EST
and -- cities visited by local custom vehicles go to c-span.org / local content. >> you're watching book tv on c-span2. here is our prime-time lineup for tonight. visit c-span.org for more on this weekend's television schedule. >> international financial diplomat william rhodes talks about the current economic and financial challenges facing the economies of europe, japan, china, and south korea. next on book tv. this is a little over an hour. [applause] >> okay. first of all, it is great to be back. we enjoyed our relationship that way. tokyo has been the headquarters of our asia-pacific operations for 25 years now. we enjoy a terrific relationship and a lot of different ways. one of my colleagues who is with me, doug peterson who just joined us from the city, and he is setting up. we welcome you, doug. dougie is all over the world. as such, he has lived quite a bit of time in japan himself. it's great to be with you tonight as well, doug. let's see. in terms of this whole notion of the book, by the way, a very modest title, banker to the world. when i heard of this, and i am a very close, pers
CSPAN
Feb 16, 2013 7:00pm EST
was first elected to the city council. i went to the city manager. i talked to him about a variety of things. said, well, we have the capitol improvements plan. we -- the things we have to do over the next ten years would cost $70 million. and he said, here's the problem. the public collectively is now willing to pay for what the public collectively wants. kendis it is so true. it's even true in congress. we -- the expectation is that there can be current or more services delivered in an efficient, professional way. and the math does not work. you know, you can do more with less once in awhile, but year after year after year you simply can't. and i think that is the most difficult thing for people to understand. and that is why, you know, you look at that captain i put up there about the weapons for the bush tax cut. now, some of it is gone back, but only some of that because by and large the american people do not want any more money spent on taxes. the price that is being paid for that is not so much an individual price. it's more a price that involves the overall health of the population
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 8:00am EST
tv. for a complete schedule, visit booktv.org. >> from new york city, now, michelle rhee, former chancellor of the d.c. public school system, recounts her career and present her thoughts on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> michelle, firstly, thank you very much for joining us. i know you've had a couple busy days from last evening, jon stewart, cnn's piers morgan, and we're really delighted to have our old friends here from c-span filming this event so that many people from across the united states can benefit from a lot of what michelle has to say. so just to kick start it this evening, michelle, how did you come up with a fascinating and interesting book, "radical," and where does this interesting name come from? >> so i think the genesis of the name is an interesting one in that when i first got to d.c. it was the lowest performing and most dysfunctional school district in the entire nation, and that was a pretty widely-known truth. and, um, so i started doing things that i thought were of course for a school district in that kind of state. i, you know, started clos
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 7:00am EST
nine votes every time the city to council took a resolution. so we really needed, even the support of romania and its successors at a time when the united states didn't like an awful lot of the things that they were, in fact, doing. keeping a coalition that broad, that deep onboard, i think it have something to say about constraining objectives. >> i was a colonel at the time, and while all this discussion was going on i was focus on running off guard and running off tackle. you know, down at the fundamental level. i had been, the two years before, the gulf war i've been on the joint chiefs of staff, and i've been the executive director of three joint chiefs of staff, and was there general powell's first six months, and the whole thing at the time, we were this close to the sink, commander-in-chief of sin, being an admiral. it went down. it was between the two-three stars because between schwarzkopf and a navy three-star admiral. because at the time it was all about the tanker wars. that's all we've been doing so there was, there was no thought -- we have no war plans. america has
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 8:15pm EST
] from new york city the former chancellor of the washington, d.c. public school system recounts her career and present your thoughts on education reform. this event is about 45 minutes. >>> thank you during much for joining us.laus i know you've had a couple of busy days, jon stewart thise mog morning and we're delighted to have our friend here from c-spah covering this event that manyg t people across the united states can really benefit from a lot ob what michelle has to say. say. just to kickstart this evening, how did you come up with a up fascinating and interesting book "r book, "radical," and where did r this come from? the >> i think the genesis of the ne name is an interesting one ing that when i first got to d.c., rst it was the lowest performing and mostpe dysfunctional school district in the nation and that was a pretty widely known truth. so i started doing things that i thought for obvious to me by started closing work reform and schools and moving out in the affected employees, cutting the central office board of bureaucracy in half and as i was taking the measures pe
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 3:00pm EST
of the economy. david grew up in new york outside of new york city and his father was a psychiatrist. he went to harvard college and then got a master's and became an investment banker doing mortgage finance at morgan stanley lehman brothers where he had a front-row seat to fannie and freddie which is something we might hear more from him in the q&a. then he got in television and he's the ceo of the game show network and came very late in life because of his tragedy. he wrote a cover story in atlanta magazine called how health care killed his father, killed my father, and then turned that into a book. it's an incredibly compelling book that i would encourage all of you to buy. there's copies outside. i am constructive to say the next season of american bible challenge, the highest rated show is coming on a few weeks. the game show network can feel like we are not stealing its ceo and we are giving them a plug, too. please join me in welcoming david. [applause] >> thank you. i'm sure everyone here reads your blog but it is a thrill. thank you for that and for the introduction today. and everyb
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 8:00pm EST
to the movie. tony kushner of course lives in new york city, recipient of tube tube -- a pulitzer prize, a tony award, an enemy and critics choice for best adapted screenplay and of course he's up for an oscar in just nine days. and frankly it should win because it made a different statement than anyone else has and all these years on lincoln on film. and it made the biggest difference i think than other films in their own genre have the same impact as this one does. he is the author of -- co-edited maurice sendak angels in americd caroline or change. his screenplays include steven spielberg's -- in today's book is the screenplay for the lincoln movie and a forward by doris kearns goodwin the communications group publishes it, 164 pages, $34 for costs and $15.90 for the paper book and you can order while we are laying -- live and we will have signed copies for you. as well we have harold holzer, his third or fourth time on, senior vice president for internal affairs at the metropolitan museum of art and cochair of the lincoln bicentennial commission, may it rest in peace. has authored or co-aut
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 12:00pm EST
and retirement at their own home, that it wasn't the time for them to go off to new york city, it wasn't the time for them to go off to philadelphia. but again, he was talked into it in terms of his duty. everyone said you are the only one who can make this new nation into a nation that will survive, and he believed that, and so he took it on. um, she came to believe that, but she still found it very hard -- found it very hard to forgive all of his political enemies who took advantage of his sense of duty to play all sorts of political games and tricks with him. .. it shows her on a platform receiving. but of course, she didn't do that. that is the 19th century re-imagination. actually, they received a plane, drawing room and she sat on the couch and often on the couch sat with her was abigail adams. abigail considered that her place to sit next to mrs. washington. they met people as they came in. they shook hands, but there was never the sense of a platform or thrown to raise them above. that was never the way that she looked at herself as the president's first lady. it was never the way that he
CSPAN
Feb 24, 2013 4:30pm EST
to the movie. tony kushner lives in new york city, the recipient of a pulitzer prize, two tony awards, an emmy, the critics choice for best adapted screen play and up for an oscar in just nine days, and frankly, it should win. we here think it should because it made a different statement than anyone else has in all these years on lincoln on film, and made the biggest difference, i think, than other films that don't have the same impact as this one does. the author -- co-ed debted wrestling, home body kabul, and caroline or change hitches screen plays including angels in america, munich, and today's book is the screen play for the lincoln movie, and it's a forward by goodwin, the communication groups publishes. 164 pages, you can order while we're live or later on as well. we'll have signed copies for you. as well we have harold holzer, co-chair of the u.s. lincoln bicentennial commission, me ad rest in peace, has co-authored 44 book0s 'lincoln and is a specialist on lincoln and the go-to guy for the media for anything lincoln and has a nice artifact collection in fact. he won the lincoln prize
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)